CSD

  • CSD
    Mozzeria

    Mozzeria the First Business Partner of the CSD Social Venture Fund

    - by CSD

    CSD is especially excited and proud to name Mozzeria – a Deaf-owned Neapolitan pizzeria based in San Francisco – as the first-ever business partner of the CSD Social Venture Fund (CSD SVF). Mozzeria and CSD will use this partnership to model the success of the Mozzeria brand and restaurant and foster the opening of a series of franchise locations across the United States.

    “I can think of no better investment for our first than Mozzeria,” said Christopher Soukup, the CEO of CSD. “[Mozzeria founders] Melody and Russ [Stein] are two of the most visible people who exemplify the entrepreneurial spirit that we know is already there in the Deaf community, just waiting to be revealed.”

    Mozzeria

    Melody and Russ in front of the Mozzeria Trolley. (Photo: Behind The Food Carts)

    Melody Stein is no stranger to the restaurant business, learning the ropes from her parents who owned restaurants in Hong Kong and San Francisco. Melody and her husband, Russ, met at Gallaudet University, where they bonded over a common love of food. They soon moved to San Francisco, when Russ, who is a native New Yorker, realized how much he missed the Italian restaurants and pizzerias of his hometown, which provided the drive to for them to create Mozzeria. “It was always our dream to open a restaurant,” said Melody.

    Mozzeria shares with CSD the same commitment to prosperity among Deaf people everywhere. Mozzeria has an all Deaf staff and nearly everything in the restaurant is designed or built by Deaf people, including all the artwork on the walls. Russ and Melody Stein, both of them former employees at CSD, said, “Mozzeria’s values and goals so completely line up with CSD’s, there was no question about setting up this partnership. I feel like we have just come full circle.”

    Mozzeria Outside the Mission District San Francisco Restaurant. (Photo: Small Business Revolution)

    The CSD SVF was created earlier in 2017 to address the employment crisis among Deaf Americans with the goal of supporting the development of Deaf-owned businesses. Soukup said that the best way to “combat the unacceptable and massive employment gap for Deaf Americans is to showcase the exceptional talents and successes of people who are Deaf.”

    Mozzeria, through the support of the CSD fund and incubator program, will receive capital funding and resources, as well as develop training materials in ASL to support the growth of new franchise locations. Melody has her sights set on uplifting the community, “With CSD’s support we will now have the opportunity to significantly grow and expand our business and create more opportunities for Deaf individuals, workers and business owners alike.”

    “Without question, Melody and Russ are an extraordinary success story and an inspiration to all of us.” said Soukup.

    Any way you slice it, this is a milestone for the Deaf community.

    For more information on the CSD Social Venture Fund please visit www.CSDSVF.com.

    To learn more about Mozzeria and the business, visit www.Mozzeria.com.

    For inquiries about the Mozzeria franchise, please email franchise@mozzeria.com.

  • CSD
    Photo of Joseph Santini

    Partnership between CSD Learns and Wells Fargo Educates Deaf Community in ASL

    - by CSD

    Access to education and information in American Sign Language (ASL) is crucial for the Deaf community’s success. CSD Learns recently received a valuable grant from Wells Fargo to support the creation of classes on financial education — presented in ASL. Launching in January, topics will include dealing with debt and starting to invest. Each course is self-paced, and works to provide each student basic financial education.

    “Wells Fargo strongly believes that people with disabilities should have the same opportunities to improve their financial health and well-being as anyone else,” said Kathy Martinez, head of disability and accessibility strategy at Wells Fargo. “We are proud to collaborate with CSD Learns to make our Hands on Banking program accessible to this community and help them succeed financially.”

    Photo of Joseph Santini
    Program Manager Joseph Santini on location filming with Wells Fargo.

    Start Learning in ASL Today

    To find out when the financial classes open, sign up for the CSD Learns email list here. If you’re ready to start learning today, it’s easy to sign up!

    You can learn from classes such as:

    Banking Basics – Take a deep dive into banking fundamentals.

    Privilege and Intersectionality – Learn about these concepts to better engage in online conversations and real-life situations.

    Just go to CSD Learns and subscribe.

    Want to know more? Watch this video for CSD Learns.

    This commercial was created with #DeafTalent.

  • CSD
    Very Well

    What Challenges Still Exist for the Deaf Community?

    - by CSD

    What life is like for the deaf and hard of hearing (HOH) has changed significantly in the past half century. Policy changes and new technologies have provided solutions for many, and yet some hurdles have stayed the same.

  • CSD
    USBLN Logo

    USBLN and Communication Service for the Deaf form strategic alliance

    - by CSD

    U.S. Business Leadership Network (USBLN) and CSD are proud to announce a strategic alliance to increase the employment rate for deaf, hard of hearing and deafblind individuals.

  • CSD
    Sirius Satellite Radio

    Doctor Radio LIVE Interview with Chris Soukup on Sirius XM

    - by CSD

    Chris Soukup, CEO of CSD chats with Dr. Jonathan Whiteson on Sirius Radio’s LIVE Doctor Radio show with 19 million subscribers on September’s Deaf Awareness Month and CSD.

    Download the Transcript
  • CSD

    CSD SDC 10th Anniversary

    - by CSD

    The CSD Student Development Center (SDC), located at Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institute of the Deaf in Rochester, New York, is celebrating its 10-year anniversary on April 27.  “The CSD SDC was developed for students to feel connected and to learn things beyond the classroom,” said CSD Chief Executive Officer Chris Soukup. “It quickly became a hub for campus activity, bringing people together to advance dialogues and partnerships, and serving as a community center, which was our ultimate goal.”

    The CSD SDC houses NTID’s student government, student life, multicultural organizations, a study center, a communication center, commuter lockers, and informal spaces, all designed to facilitate socialization and interaction. It also features artwork by Deaf and hearing artists with ties to NTID, and Ellie’s Place, a first-floor lounge named after the late NTID Associate Dean for Student and Academic Affairs Eleanor Rosenfield.

    “Over these past 10 years, the CSD SDC has become the heart of campus life at RIT/NTID,” said Gerard Buckley, NTID president and RIT vice president and dean. “The facility provides space for leadership opportunities that are essential for our students’ success. We are grateful to CSD for their visionary generosity, and look forward to future collaborations.”

    Part of the 10-year celebration is the launch of a partnership between CSD Creative and RIT/NTID’s Center on Access Technology at the SDC. “Given such a successful collaboration, it seemed only natural that we establish a partnership with RIT/NTID’s Center on Access Technology in the CSD SDC, especially with RIT/NTID’s outstanding graphic design, technology, multi-media and visual communications programs,” Soukup added. “This partnership is a great way to combine resources and hands-on experience alongside some of the best Deaf talent in the field, many who are RIT/NTID graduates.”

    CSD Creative, led by CSD Creative’s Bryce Chapman and RIT/NTID’s Center on Access Technology Director Gary Behm, provides students with real-life learning experiences in web design and development, graphic design, digital advertising, brand development, photography, videography, and content marketing. “We all have a responsibility to support students, including through mentorship and work experiences, to prepare them for their careers after graduation,” Soukup noted. “With such a solid team of Deaf talent in graphic and web design, photography, and videography, CSD Creative’s new collaboration is a great opportunity for RIT/NTID students to gain valuable co-op experience, and sharpen their professional skills.”

    “We want students to see CSD Creative as a resource throughout their academic studies, and to consider CSD as a potential career choice,” Soukup added. “It’s a win-win situation for all involved.”

    For more information, contact Gary Behm (gwbnts@rit.edu)  or visit www.ntid.rit.edu/cat.

  • CSD
    Headshot of Danny Lacy

    Danny Lacey, CSD’s new Chair of the Board

    - by Jessica Ellison

    By Jessica Ellison

    Danny Lacey is a partner and advisor for Kramer Wealth Managers. He leads Kramer’s advisory team for the western states where he serves pre-retirees and retirees, corporate executives, business owners, and not-for-profit organizations.

    Danny has served on the board for 3 years and we’re excited to have him serve as Board Chair. We had the opportunity to sit down and talk with Danny before the holidays. Keep reading to get to know him a little better!

    CSD: What are the most important goals you will work on with CSD?

    Danny Lacey: I want to be a strong and effective facilitator between CSD & its board members. I plan to ensure that our board duties, expectations and efforts are fully aligned with CSD’s vision and mission. I also think it’s very important to promote dialogue with people outside of CSD so that we can share stories about the wider Deaf community with the world, to share the wide range of possibilities in the journey of reimagining communication together.

    CSD: What do you see as Deaf America’s greatest strengths and challenges?

    Danny Lacey: This is truly an exciting time for Deaf America. Thanks to advancements in technology, particularly social media, we continue to enjoy learning about success stories in the Deaf community every day. We believe that we are exceptional in all that we do. Our biggest challenge right now is not showing it enough in the global society.

    CSD: CSD believes that instead of separate hearing and Deaf worlds that there really is just One World – and we all share it. What is your vision of One World? How do you see us getting there?

    Danny Lacey: For over 40 years, CSD’s mission has been to improve the lives of deaf and hard of hearing people by continuously aiming to build a more inclusive, accessible world. Now, more than ever, it is the perfect time for CSD to be at the forefront of pursuing the One World vision, and in demonstrating all that is truly possible in the One World.

    CSD: What kind of food will we find on your table this holiday season?

    Danny Lacey: Along with great conversations and much laughter at the dinner table, my family loves sharing Pecan & Chocolate Chip Pie — just a perfect way to celebrate our holiday season!

  • CSD
    Trudy Suggs on How Virtualization Allows Deaf Community Roots to Remain Strong

    Trudy Suggs on How Virtualization Allows Deaf Community Roots to Remain Strong

    - by CSD

    [Video Transcript]

    It’s so nice that you get to work from home and don’t have to deal with stress!

    I thought you didn’t work. You’re a stay-at-home mom, aren’t you?

    Oh, wow! You work? All this time I thought your husband was supporting the family!

    You’re so lucky you can work from home in your pajamas!

    Although I’ve worked from home for 14 years now, I still deal with a lot of misconceptions about working at home. The questions are getting better nowadays, given the proliferation of teleworking — thankfully. Even so, the number one question I get is, “How do you do it?” I’ll answer that in a bit, but first, let me talk about why working from home is so beneficial particularly for the Deaf community.

    The work-from-home model served me well when my family made the life-changing decision to move from Minnesota to Maryland in early 2014.  Unlike many other couples going through similar experiences, we didn’t have to worry about employment. My husband had already been offered a job, so we only had to sell our house, pack up, and move east without worrying about how we would afford it. This was because my employment situation wasn’t changing; I was just changing addresses.

    People always have had to relocate for job opportunities, but this is especially true for Deaf people, who may want to be geographically near other Deaf people rather than a remote location with limited access. For example, during World War II, Akron, Ohio, was a popular location for Deaf people simply because of the Goodyear and Firestone factories hiring them in droves.  Other areas well-populated by Deaf people often were, and are, where Deaf schools or agencies serving Deaf people exist: Frederick, Md., Austin, Texas, St. Augustine, Fla., or Faribault, Minn., just to name a few. While this clustering has many benefits, it also creates a unique set of problems — and virtualization is a fantastic solution.


    The CSD website states, “Our employees are leaders. By going virtual, we’re able to keep them exactly where they need to be: in their own communities. By keeping leaders in place, we keep our Deaf communities strong.”


    Exactly! Instead of making Deaf people uproot their entire lives and families, leave the area they’ve grown to love (or even grown up in), and leave their friends and activities for a job — they can continue thriving in their home communities with their friends and loved ones. They can go to their favorite restaurants, their favorite stores, and their favorite spots. They don’t have to sell the houses they’ve worked hard for, or give up anything. As anyone who has had to relocate for a job knows, especially for those who are Deaf and not necessarily in an accessible location, it can be challenging to rebuild networks, meet new people, and learn the local culture.

    Within these local networks are state associations affiliated with the National Association of the Deaf, many of which are struggling to maintain membership numbers. One reason for this struggle is the departure of key community members to their new job locations. By going virtual, CSD — one of the largest employers of people who are Deaf or hard of hearing — can nurture thriving local organizations and close community ties. As CSD’s website says, “Decentralizing our operations allows us to widen our reach. Together, we are strengthening our communities and changing the world.”

    Let’s not forget the daily commute. People don’t have to battle the highways (anyone who has driven the 270 and 495 to Washington, D.C., during rush hour knows exactly what I’m talking about) to get to work. Instead, they can get out of bed, get dressed — not in pajamas! — and get to work.

    Virtualization also makes balancing work and parenting a lot easier. Parents don’t have to make sacrifices or difficult decisions anymore; instead, they can work around their children’s schedules, and schedule work activities in between games, school events, or meetings. While this does take some impressive juggling (thank goodness for shared calendars!), it can be done.

    By now, you know the answer to how I do it, especially with four young children: technology. When I first established T.S. Writing Services, in 2003, people could not fathom how I could make money because the technology was still so new. I remember taking a business owners course in 2004, and I was the only business owner who had an Internet-based company. Without video technology and the Internet, T.S. Writing Services would never have made it this far. I’ve put together a wonderful team of writers, editors, and designers who are Deaf or hard of hearing, and they all get to stay right in their communities — thanks to virtualization.

    For the revitalized and forward-thinking CSD, this virtualization is a wonderful step in the right direction. This approach strengthens our Deaf ecosystem, nurtures local communities and organizations, and fosters a stronger sense of unity among the people we share our lives with, locally and nationally.

  • CSD
    Patti Canne, winner of Community Engagement Survey

    Community Engagement Survey: And the winner is …

    - by Brian Jensen

    By Brian Jensen

    CSD’s first Community Engagement Survey is officially closed. Thank you all for taking the time to participate. We have a lot of great information to go through!

    The survey lasted for 30 days and we had a total of 1,684 responses. It featured a random drawing for a 9.7 inch iPad Pro (retail value $599.00).

    And, the winner is …

    Patti Canne of Rochester, New York!

    Patti is currently a 2nd Year B.A. student studying Social Work at Gallaudet University. She told us a little about herself: “I had a dream to finish my bachelor’s degree for many years. I finished my AAS degree at NTID in 2001 when I had four little children at that time. After my last child graduated last June, I decided to go back to Gallaudet to go after my dreams. I attended Gallaudet University for a year and left. I just wanted to go after my dreams. I tell students and professors that it is never too late to go back to school at all!”

    When we asked her about her aspirations, she replied, “I have so many hopes and dreams. My goal is to help the Deaf people to have a better quality of life and to help them to reach their goals and dreams. So many Deaf and hard of hearing people give up their dreams or goals. I hope to fight for better access and equal rights for Deaf people who want to have jobs in the future, as well as with Deaf plus other disabilities, too.”

    And then her favorite quote: “You are never too old to set another goal or to dream a new dream” – by C.S. Lewis

    We agree and we’re with you all the way, Patti!

    If you didn’t win, don’t worry. We’ll be doing this again in the next few months with another cool prize! Be sure to sign up for our newsletter. We will keep you informed!

  • CSD
    Community Engagement Survey

    CSD’s Recent Survey Shows Strong Following by People Over 50 Years Old

    - by Ryan Commerson

    By Ryan Commerson

    At the beginning of July, CSD posted a survey and received over 2,000 responses to date. The results showed people between the ages of 18 and 34 were not very familiar with CSD or the organization’s work. CSD recognizes the need to change that. For starters, we have rolled out bold new initiatives like CSD Works, CSD Learns and Direct Services.


    “One of our strategic goals is to measurably advance our outreach and impact on the global public and the many communities we serve,” said Brandi Rarus, CSD vice president of public relations and community engagement. “We will use this quick and easy survey to establish a benchmark. Later, we will repeat the questionnaire and measure our community engagement. This will help us understand how we are perceived and to hold ourselves accountable.”


    Our survey has ended, keep an eye out for future surveys to come!